QUAID NE KAHA - Sayings of Quaid e Azam

QUAID NE KAHA - Sayings of Quaid e Azam

We are proud to have Quaid e Azam as our leader. He was one in a million and still lives in the heart of every Pakistani. (Quaid nay Kaha) are his words of wisdom which inspire us even today and guide us in every aspect of our lives. For inspiration, learn from his beautiful quotes given below. 

 

  • We are starting with this fundamental principle that we are all citizens and equal citizens of one State.(Presidential Address to the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan on 11th August, 1947.)

 

  • As you know, history shows that in England conditions, some time ago, were much worse than those prevailing in India today. The Roman Catholics and the Protestants persecuted each other. Even now there are some States in existence where there are discriminations made and bars imposed against a particular class. Thank God, we are not starting in those days. We are starting in the days when there is no discrimination, no distinction between one community and another, no discrimination between one caste or creed and another. We are starting with this fundamental principle that we are all citizens and equal citizens of one State. 
  • (Presidential Address to the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan on 11th August, 1947.)

 

  •  The great majority of us are Muslims. We follow the teachings of the Prophet Mohammed (may peace be upon him). We are members of the brotherhood of Islam in which all are equal in rights, dignity and self-respect. Consequently, we have a special and a very deep sense of unity. But make no mistake: Pakistan is not a theocracy or anything like it. 
  • (Broadcast talk to the people of Australia recorded on 19th February, 1948.)

 

  • There is no power on earth that can undo Pakistan. 
  • (Speech at a Mammoth Rally at the University Stadium, Lahore on 30th October. 1947.)

 

  • Yet this is a truth people so easily seem to forget and begin to prize local, sectional or provincial interests above and regardless of the national interests. It naturally pains me to find the curse of provincialism holding sway over any section of Pakistan. Pakistan must be rid of this evil. 
  • (Reply to the Civic Address presented by the Quetta Municipality on 15th June, 1948)

 

  • We are now all Pakistanis--not Baluchis, Pathans, Sindhis, Bengalis, Punjabis and so on--and as Pakistanis we must feet behave and act, and we should be proud to be known as Pakistanis and nothing else. 
  • (Reply to the Civic Address presented by the Quetta Municipality on 15th June, 1948.)

 

  • You are free; you are free to go to your temples. You are free to go to your mosques or to any other places of worship in this State of Pakistan. You may belong to any religion, caste or creed --that has nothing to do with the business of the State. 
  • (Presidential Address to the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan on 11th August, 1947.)

 

  • The Constituent Assembly has got two main functions to perform. The first is the very onerous and responsible task of framing our future Constitution of Pakistan and the second of functioning as a full and complete Sovereign body as the Federal Legislature of Pakistan. 
  • (Presidential Address to the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan on 11th August, 1947.)

 

  • The first and the foremost thing that I would like to emphasize is this --remember that you are now a Sovereign Legislative body and you have got all the powers. It, therefore, places on you the gravest responsibility as to how you should take your decisions. 
  • (Presidential Address to the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan on 11th August, 1947.)

 

  • My guiding principle will be justice and complete impartiality, and I am sure that with your support and co-operation, I can look forward to Pakistan becoming one of the greatest Nations of the world.
  • (Presidential Address to the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan on 11th August, 1947.)

 

  • The Story of Pakistan, its struggle and its achievement, is the very story of great human ideals, struggling to survive in the face of great odds and difficulties. 
  • (Address to the people in Chittagong, 23rd March, 1948.)

 

  • We should have a State in which we could live and breathe as free men and which we could develop according to our own lights and culture and where principles of Islamic social justice could find free play. 
  • (Address to Civil, Naval, Military and Air Force Officers of Pakistan Government, Karachi October 11, 1947.)

 

  • We should begin to work in that spirit and in course of time all these angularities of the majority and minority communities will vanish. 
  • (Presidential Address to the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan on 11th August, 1947.)

 

  • The exploits of your leaders in many a historic field of battle; the progress of your Revolution; the rise and career of the great Ataturk, his revitalization of your nation by his great statesmanship, courage and foresight all these stirring events are well-known to the people of Pakistan. 
  • (Reply to the speech made by the first Turkish Ambassador to Pakistan at the time of presenting Credentials to the Quaid-i-Azam on 4th March. 1948.)

 

  • I have nothing to do with this pseudo-religious approach that Gandhi is advocating. 
  • (Jinnah speaking to Durga Das in London.)

 

  • Think 100 times before you take a decision, But once that decision is taken, stand by it as one man. 
  • (In 1937, following elections held under the new government of India Act.)

 

  • I have always maintained that no nation can ever be worthy of its existence that cannot take its women along with the men. No struggle can ever succeed without women participating side by side with men. There are two powers in the world; one is the sword and the other is the pen. There is a great competition and rivalry between the two. There is a third power stronger than both, that of the women.
  • (Speech at Islamia College for women March 25, 1940.)

 

  • Any idea of a United India could never have worked and in my judgment it would have led us to terrific disaster. 
  • (Presidential Address to the Constituent Assembly of Pakistan on 11th August, 1947.)

 

  • The prosperity and advancement of a nation depend upon its intelligentsia, and Muslim India is looking forward to her young generation and education classes to give a bold lead for our guidance and a brilliant record of historical achievements and traditions. 
  • (December 24, 1940.)

 

  • I particularly appeal to our intelligentsia and students to come forward and rise to the occasion. You have performed wonders in the past. You are still capable of repeating the history. You are not lacking in the great qualities and virtues in comparison with the other nations. Only you have to be fully conscious of that fact and to act with courage, faith and unity. 
  • (Message to Pakistan Day, issued from Delhi March 23, 1943.)

 

  • No nation can rise to the height of glory unless your women are side by side with you. We are victims of evil customs. It is a crime against humanity that our women are shut up within the four walls of the houses as prisoners. There is no sanction anywhere for the deplorable condition in which our women have to live. 
  • (Speech at a meeting of the Muslim University Union, Aligarh March 10, 1944.)

 

  • Our object should be peace within, and peace without. We want to live peacefully and maintain cordial friendly relations with our immediate neighbours and with the world at large. 
  • (Lahore, August 15th, 1947.)

 

  • My message to you all is of hope, courage and confidence. Let us mobilize all our resources in a systematic and organized way and tackle the grave issues that confront us with grim determination and discipline worthy of a great nation. 
  • (Eid-ul-Azha Message to the Nation October 24, 1947.)

 

  • You have to stand guard over the development and maintenance of democracy, social justice and the equality of manhood in your own native soil. With faith, discipline and selfless devotion to duty, there is nothing worthwhile that you cannot achieve. 
  • (Address to the officers and men of the 5th Heavy Ack Ack and 6th Light Ack Ack Regiments in Malir, Karachi February 21, 1948.)

 

  • That freedom can never be attained by a nation without suffering and sacrifice has been amply borne out by the recent tragic happenings in this subcontinent. We are in the midst of unparalleled difficulties and untold sufferings; we have been through dark days of apprehension and anguish; but I can say with confidence that with courage and self-reliance and by the Grace of God we shall emerge triumphant. 
  • (Speech at a Mammoth Rally at the University Stadium, Lahore October 30, 1947.)

 

  • We must work our destiny in our own way and present to the world an economic system based on true Islamic concept of equality of manhood and social justice. We will thereby be fulfilling our mission as Muslims and giving to humanity the message of peace which alone can save it and secure the welfare, happiness and prosperity of mankind. 
  • (Speech at the opening ceremony of the State Bank of Pakistan, Karachi July 1, 1948.)